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Rojkind and BIG design the new Tamayo Museum Atizapan Extension with help from HP Graphic Arts

 
 

“We are aggressive in
pushing not only the limits of architecture, but also those of graphic design and project presentation.”

— Michel Rojkind, Architect

Buildings with soul

Whether designing a private residence or a public space, architect Michel Rojkind’s philosophy is the same: buildings, like people, have souls. They have unique personalities that grow and change with the world around them.

Quick Facts

  • Innovative architects Michel Rojkind and Bjarke Ingels win the Tamayo Museum Atizapan Extension design competition.
  • Rojkind and Ingels’ building lets viewers see every stage of the exhibition process, including unpacking, restoring and installing the artwork.
  • The HP Designjet T1100 Printer with Vivera inks enabled the team to create vivid, photo-realistic renderings that impressed the judges.


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“Buildings get filled with energy by people coming in and out and by the experiences they have there,” he says. “There are some buildings you enter, and it’s just magical; it’s magical because of how the light comes in, or because of the silence, or the way the sound bounces off the walls.”

Recently Rojkind, whose Mexico City-based firm rojkind arquitectos has been rated among the top ten design vanguard firms in the world, collaborated with the Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group Architects (BIG) to enter a competition to design a new building for the Tamayo Museum of Contemporary Art.

The team’s innovative design for a cantilevered building inspired by the shape of an opened box was selected as the winner.

Thinking inside the box

The Tamayo Museum gave entrants detailed directions for their designs; the client provided diagrams, floor plans and instructions for how the space should work. It was up to the competing architects to innovate within those parameters.

While some critics interpreted the cross formation as a religious symbol, Rojkind and Ingels envisioned something else: a cube that was unfolded and opened up to the viewer.

Rojkind

“The building’s initial purpose was to
exhibit and store different works of art on a rotational basis, but then the idea of being
more transparent gained currency and was incorporated into the plans.”


The team’s winning design included making the space where artwork is delivered, unpacked, restored and installed an exhibition itself.

“I believe that’s what convinced them to give us the project,” Rojkind says. “The clients really liked the idea that everything became an exhibition space. We call it the open box because in Mexico, it will be the first museum where the general public can visit the storage space.”

From imagination to image

In addition to wowing the judges with an innovative design, the team created spectacular presentation materials, including color placards, to communicate their vision for the new museum. Concept books were also delivered in boxes that opened up to form the cross shape of the building.

The team used Rojkind’s HP Designjet T1100 Printer with HP Vivera inks to print vivid, high-quality renderings in-house. “The clients congratulated us not only on the project, but also on the way it was presented,” Rojkind says. “When they saw the quality of the renderings, they were blown away.”

Rojkind says photo-realistic renderings with the highest image quality possible are critical at this stage. They help the client visualize the concept, allowing them to see everything from the materials used to how the building will look as part of the landscape.

“We are aggressive in pushing not only the limits of architecture, but also those of graphic design and project presentation,” Rojkind says. “The clients realize that if you’re concerned about the detail of a book or print, you’re going to be concerned about the detail of the building.”

Technology for all

To achieve the level of detail and quality he needs, Rojkind trusts HP technology. Recently he chose to expand his printing capabilities by adding the new HP Designjet T1120 SD Multifunction Printer to his office.

“We’ve been working with HP for eight or nine years, and it’s been great. If somebody is looking for precision lines, we have them; if somebody is looking for precision colors and great image quality, we have those too.”

Rojkind, who recently became part of the HP Experts & Mentors network, adds, “HP printers are very practical solutions, not only for architects, but for photographers, graphic designers, industrial designers — everybody that’s involved in our projects.”